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Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

R.I.C.E.R.I.C.E.

Image R.I.C.E.

R.I.C.E. stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation. Doing these things helps limit pain and swelling after an injury. R.I.C.E. also helps injuries heal faster. Use R.I.C.E. for sprains, strains, and severe bruises or bumps. Follow the tips on this handout and begin R.I.C.E. as soon as possible after an injury.

Image of foot  Rest

Pain is your body's way of telling you to rest an injured area. Whether you have hurt an elbow, hand, foot, or knee, limiting its use will prevent further injury and help you heal.

Image  Compression

Putting pressure (compression) on an injury helps prevent swelling and provides support.

  • Wrap the injured area firmly with an elastic bandage. If your hand or foot tingles, becomes discolored, or feels cold to the touch, the bandage may be too tight. Rewrap it more loosely.

  • If your bandage becomes too loose, rewrap it.

  • Do not wear an elastic bandage overnight.

Image  Ice

Applying ice right after an injury helps prevent swelling and reduce pain. Don't place ice directly on your skin.

  • Wrap a cold pack or bag of ice in a thin cloth. Place it over the injured area.

  • Ice for 10 minutes every 3 hours. Don't ice for more than 20 minutes at a time.

Image  Elevation Image

Keeping an injury raised helps reduce swelling, pain, and throbbing. It also speeds healing. Elevate the injured area whenever possible.

 

Call your health care provider if you notice any of the following:

  • Fingers or toes feel numb, are cold to the touch, or change color

  • Skin looks shiny or tight

  • Pain, swelling, or bruising worsens and is not improved with elevation

  

Publication Source: National Athletic Trainers Association

Publication Source: Sports Injury Clinic.net

Online Source: National Athletic Trainers Association

Online Source: Sports Injury Clinic.net

Date Last Reviewed: 2004-09-17T00:00:00-06:00

Date Last Modified: 2002-07-09T00:00:00-06:00

R.I.C.E.R.I.C.E.

Image R.I.C.E.

R.I.C.E. stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation. Doing these things helps limit pain and swelling after an injury. R.I.C.E. also helps injuries heal faster. Use R.I.C.E. for sprains, strains, and severe bruises or bumps. Follow the tips on this handout and begin R.I.C.E. as soon as possible after an injury.

Image of foot  Rest

Pain is your body's way of telling you to rest an injured area. Whether you have hurt an elbow, hand, foot, or knee, limiting its use will prevent further injury and help you heal.

Image  Compression

Putting pressure (compression) on an injury helps prevent swelling and provides support.

  • Wrap the injured area firmly with an elastic bandage. If your hand or foot tingles, becomes discolored, or feels cold to the touch, the bandage may be too tight. Rewrap it more loosely.

  • If your bandage becomes too loose, rewrap it.

  • Do not wear an elastic bandage overnight.

Image  Ice

Applying ice right after an injury helps prevent swelling and reduce pain. Don't place ice directly on your skin.

  • Wrap a cold pack or bag of ice in a thin cloth. Place it over the injured area.

  • Ice for 10 minutes every 3 hours. Don't ice for more than 20 minutes at a time.

Image  Elevation Image

Keeping an injury raised helps reduce swelling, pain, and throbbing. It also speeds healing. Elevate the injured area whenever possible.

 

Call your health care provider if you notice any of the following:

  • Fingers or toes feel numb, are cold to the touch, or change color

  • Skin looks shiny or tight

  • Pain, swelling, or bruising worsens and is not improved with elevation

  

Publication Source: National Athletic Trainers Association

Publication Source: Sports Injury Clinic.net

Online Source: National Athletic Trainers Association

Online Source: Sports Injury Clinic.net

Date Last Reviewed: 2004-09-17T00:00:00-06:00

Date Last Modified: 2002-07-09T00:00:00-06:00

Experience optimal physical therapy techniques and compassionate patient care at Benton Franklin Orthopedic Associates and Benton Franklin Physical Therapy. Call us today at 509.586.2828 to schedule an appointment or use our online Request an Appointment form.

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